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South Shields premier political blog

Banished from the Queen’s English?

with 3 comments

I laughed so much I nearly fell off my dictionary

A group of Americans at Lake Superior State University in Michigan have compiled a list of words, phrases, and idioms which they would like to see banned from the “Queen’s English”. Words and phrases, which they believe, have become so over used that they have lost the concept of their original meaning.

Don’t get me wrong I don’t mind them trying to improve the American linguistic culture, but what makes me laugh is their mistaken belief that  America speaks the Queen’s English – come on get real dudes!

  • Since when was a hood  transformed into a car bonnet?
  • Since when was a trunk  transformed into a boot of a car?
  • Since when was a wallet transformed into a bill fold?
  • Since when was a cheque paid with a bill?
  • Since when did a locality or estate become a ‘hood?
  • Since when was a nappy transformed into a diaper?
  • Since when was a bench seat transformed into a bleacher?

Kinda s2pid eh?

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Written by curly

January 3, 2009 at 11:46 am

3 Responses

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  1. It gets worse. Americans can’t tell the difference between to alternate (i.e. between two states) and (any number of) alternatives. They don’t know the difference between a bill, a cheque and a check: they’re all “check” over there.

    There are many other examples of “dimbo speak”. We have some of our own, of course; but putting the worst together is not my idea of an evolving language. In fact, it’s devolving it!

    Oh, and while I’m at it: I want the word “gay” back, and a new word devised for any different meaning. Surely that can’t be beyond the wit of those concerned, can it?

    John Ward

    January 3, 2009 at 1:30 pm

  2. How about banning the use of the phrase the Queen’s English? An affected dialect spoken by fewer than 3% of British people, and falling.

    Michael

    January 4, 2009 at 10:07 am

  3. I have a problem with the language but just because items are called by different names does not make them different. A friend in Gateshead and I were Instant messaging last evening and he said he was watching a program on TV about cowboys. Well, he was talking about irreputable tradesmen and I was talking about John Wayne. It does make it a lot of fun finding our our differences but I do miss trying to translate Geordie speak which you are unable to do when typing with IM

    Clare, Clinton, New York, USA

    January 4, 2009 at 6:15 pm


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