Curly's Corner Shop, the blog!

South Shields premier political blog

Archive for the ‘Blair’ Category

All in it together

with 12 comments

Brown bookOf course they are!

“We are all in this together”  may have been the most prophetic words uttered by Conservative Leader David Cameron following the post crash demise of the last Labour government, leaving an economy in tatters and the whole of Europe drowning in debt after the sage advice of Brown and Obama to governments and central banks to borrow more and print more money to keep the world floating happily along towards oblivion. Cameron’s words were meant to galvanise public opinion as we entered an age of austerity to tackle the worldwide mountains of debt and return the UK to a “balanced budget” after the profligacy of the Brown/Blair years, yet after two budgets from the coalition government the achievment of that aim does not seem to be approaching with any speed.

We had just gone through a Parliament awash with excess, the MPs expenses scandal had left a very nasty taste in the mouth and the reforms put in place have not done an awful lot to assuage public anger and resentment at what politicians are perceived to be doing with their time and our money, the News International phone hacking revelations and the subsequent Leveson inquiry will probably also confirm the public’s suspicions that our politicians are easy to influence and are seen to be far too close to some journalists and newspaper proprietors for the sake of good honest and open public governance.

Having taken what they think is statesmanlike stances during their years in office it may seem unedifying to some that former holders of great office now hawk themselves around on the world’s stage making an absolute fortune and banking their income not in a personal account, but into the account of a privately owned company specifically set up to reduce their liability to pay the full rate of UK tax. Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, and South Shields MP David Miliband all operate such companies and manage to reduce their tax liabilities by sums that some of us may never manage to earn in a year. Don’t get me wrong, we should all praise success, but if we are all in this together we should all be paying our fair share of taxes.

This “being in it together” though, is now becoming a catch phrase of the left, perhaps Cameron may regret having uttered those words in the first place, there are many who would just love to push them back down his throat, and if they have a reasoned cogent argument then why not? Trouble is, some are none too careful about republishing these words, take for example the septuagenarian Star Trek actor Patrick Stewart, invited by David Miliband to deliver one of his South Shields lectures:

“I have nothing but contempt for the expression ‘we’re all in this together.

That’s bullshit – we’re not all in this together,”

“The members of the cabinet are not in the same position as the people who live near me in Bermondsey. What we have seen is not so much a response to a global crisis but Tory policies as usual, masquerading under the claim of necessity.”

Putting aside the fallibility of memory, Stewart seems to miss the response to the UK crisis as well as missing the point on worldwide debt reduction, it does not look or sound so good bleating about the phrase “we are in this together” when one has resided in such luxurious surroundings as these in California:
Patrick Stewarts Californian residence

Picture via Guido Fawkes

The lofty left certainly do not so sound so chummy and down to earth when their wealth is revealed, the folks of Queensferry, Westoe, Trimdon, or Bermondsey must be choking with contempt at any politician/actor (hard to tell the difference with Tony Blair) talking about “being in it together”.

Beam me up Scotty, I want to be in it together with you 🙂

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

David Miliband using tax loophole for avoidance

leave a comment »

david milibandAnnual tax savings estimated at six figures!

South Shields’ part time MP David Miliband may add another couple of words to his CV having been variously described as a globe trotter, Labour leadership loser, former Foreign Secretary, chip shop connoisseur, banana waver, a man with high earning outside interests, and now a tax avoider!

Since losing the battle to lead the Labour party to his brother Ed, the man that Tony Blair pushed onto the people of South Shields is trying his hardest not to mirror the lifestyles and wage earning capacities of the majority of his constituents in South Tyneside by adding to the growing list of opportunities available to former cabinet ministers. Speech making has never quite been so profitable for former front bench performers, add this to consultancies, and the vice-chairmanship of Sunderland AFC and our rarely seen Member of Parliament can justifiably claim to have never had it so good!

Last November (as reported in the MPs Register of Interests), David Miliband joined the advisory board of the Sir Bani Yas Forum in Abu Dhabi, the Daily Mail reported that  he was paid almost £5000 for transport and accommodation for himself and a member of his staff, and also received £64,475 from the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs! The article also claims that he receives pay at a rate of more than £21000 per day from the UAE, and his recent decision to do work for a Pakistani company, Indus Basin Holdings, earns him an additional £50000 per annum for five days work!

Rather than being paid personally and taxed through PAYE, like the majority of us, Miliband’s earnings are channelled through a company jointly owned by himself and his wife Louise, the Office of David Miliband Limited, and by exploiting both partners tax allowances and taking their income in the form of share dividends, it is estimated that Mr. Miliband is avoiding paying taxes to the tune of a six figure number. Laughing all the way to the bank!

You might want to complain about how much other people are paying David Miliband, personally I’m not that bothered, best of luck to him I say. I am a bit bothered by this stance over tax though, particularly as it was an area that the last Labour government intended to address. Alistair Darling was determined to close this tax avoidance loophole, and some couples were hounded through the courts by HM Revenue before it became clear that the practice was legal, then Labour declared :

‘The Government will therefore bring forward proposals for changes to legislation.’

Fortunately for Miliband, they never did, it must be just a little embarrassing for him though to be seen to be so out of step with his constituents, and to be seen as avoiding his full tax bill when many of those who struggle to keep up to date with benefits regulations are hauled through the courts.

Meanwhile in another article Oliver Wright suggests that David Miliband is still struggling to come to terms with his brother’s leadership and is happier to be a big earner away from Labour’s front bench, sadly Wright suggests that the two have an awkward relationship and only meet rarely at family events even suggesting that he still finds it very difficult to be in a room with Ed.

It does make me wonder what former South Shields MPs such as Arthur Blenkinsop or Chuter Ede would have made of their modern day successor.

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

Written by curly

January 30, 2012 at 12:59 pm

Old friends

with 8 comments

Any sightings, please pass on to William Hague.

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

Written by curly

August 24, 2011 at 6:20 am

Hacked off by “The Torygraph”?

with one comment

Gilligan guns for Sovereign Strategy

Andrew Gilligan, the former BBC journalist who was at the genesis of the Blair/Campbell “sexed up document” story, had a right good go at Sovereign Strategy the lobbying company headed by former South Tyneside councillor and MEP Alan Donnelly and current council leader Iain Malcolm in yesterday’s Sunday Telegraph. In a curious article he exposed many of Sovereign Strategy’s tactics in raising cash and then passing on amounts of it to the Labour Party nationally and locally, the main two points of his piece are that (a) the lobbyist is working with the Hacked Off campaign to keep the phone hacking story in the news, and (b) that News International don’t like the firm and he repeats a whole string of allegations made by The Times and The Sunday Times over recent years.

I am just curious as to what Gillligan was hoping to prove or achieve:  so long as we have the type of democracy which involves close links between the press and politicians we will always have professional lobbying firms, and pressure groups working around the fringes or deep within the heart of politics beavering away at ensuring certain issues of interest are prominent in the minds of politicians. Presently, we expect and hope that the relationships between journalists of News International and leading politicians, from all parties, are kept under the closest possible scrutiny until Parliament and the courts have all reached the end of their deliberations. I assume that Gilligan also wants to see full transparency amongst those trading blows during this process, but there will be many other groups and companies similarly involved in gaining privileged access to government ministers who will fall below the radar, and some of these will undoubtedly be supporters and financiers of the Conservative Party.

I just wonder what the effect of articles such as this will be on the revenues of lobbying companies now being bleached by the sunlight, as businesses in the north-east discover that £5000 fees paid to the North-East Economic Forum, which is a very useful body for gathering opinion and strategic regeneration ideas,  is drip fed to the Labour Party to the tune of £160000 over the past nine years, with an additional £41000 personally coming from Alan Donnelly?

It would be interesting to hear either Alan Donnelly’s or Iain Malcolm’s opinion on Gilligan’s surgical excisions into their business. Are they well and truly Hacked Off?

:: :: :: Digg itadd to ma.gnoliaStumble It!add to simpyseed the vineTailRank ::

Written by curly

July 25, 2011 at 11:48 am

“Rocky” Cameron rolls with the punches

with 3 comments

PM emerges bruised from the debate but not battered.

Haven’t done a “pea roast” for a while so I thought I’d throw a couple in today.

Apologies for the lack of posts recently, I’ve been doing a gargantuan research into the analytics of this blog which has now been running for six and a half years, a lot has changed over that time in terms of readership and demographics along with a huge increase in the amount of blogging, micro blogging, social networking,  and the platforms which carry such content. Suffice to say that this blog either needs to keep up with the pace of change or close completely in advance of a new offering. There certainly will be changes over the coming months, the first of which will be a total overhaul of the sidebar links, many of which are now dead, followed by a complete alteration to the style sheet and template. Sorry it has taken so much of my time but it has been a necessary journey.

I managed to catch the first hour and a half of yesterdays debate in the House of Commons and the Prime Minister’s statement about the phone hacking affair, a debate in which he was seen to come out fighting and defended himself reasonably well against MPs lined up to beat him into submission. This was no “humble pie” moment, but a tough fight, Cameron had his back against the ropes and had to take on all comers, he was expecting a heavyweight onslaught from Ed Miliband but the Opposition Leader appeared to have lost some weight, or focus, and only managed to pepper “Call me Dave” with middleweight shots to the midriff, however it was enough to strengthen the nerve of his corner who sent in wave after wave of bruisers to rough up the PM. Cameron didn’t hide away, he stood in the ring for what seemed like 38 rounds and after the fight was roundly applauded by his supporters, including what looked like a 13 year old schoolboy journalist Daniel Knowles.

So a success for David Cameron, but Ed Miliband is not too unhappy either. The Parliamentary Labour Party seems satisfied enough with the few hits he has landed over the past fortnight. In fact, I just spotted him in Strangers’ Bar with (I think) David Miliband with a broad grin on his face. So both leaders are going into recess as secure as they could reasonably hope to be. Everyone’s a winner – everyone but Rupert Murdoch anyway.

The South Shields MP David Miliband must have been pleased, nobody mentioned his partying with the Murdochs!

The party, held two weekends ago, reveals the extent of the couple’s connections on both sides of the Commons.

As a jazz band played in the landscaped gardens of the £6  million property, Mr Freud, who was wearing leather trousers, greeted guests, including Education Secretary Michael Gove and Culture Minister Ed Vaizey. They drank champagne in the company of former Labour Cabinet Ministers Peter Mandelson, David Miliband, James Purnell and Douglas Alexander.

He’d also be pleased in knowing that news of his other work for US corporations was well and truly buried by yesterday’s cream pie bun fight as he continues treading the path created by his mentor Tony Blair.

However it was good to be reminded by the PM that the vast majority of the phone hacking outrages happened some years ago whilst Blair, Brown, and Miliband were running the ship on to the rocks, as we recalled Rebekah Brooks statement the previous day that she’d been invited to Downing Street about six times a year by the last Prime Minister but so far not once by Cameron. The PM also got in a great right hook at Ed Miliband by reminding him that since Coulson is no longer in government employ, the only person with an ex News International hack working for them is the Leader of the Opposition!

As a “judgement day” fight it lived up to it’s billing, the referee had a great deal of work to do much of it in keeping the baying hoards quiet, some just wished that Bercow could manage to be a little more even handed and hush the Labour benches too. Miliband the middleweight could be judged to be both effective and dangerous in the opening rounds but he soon ran out of steam, the fact that he still has a former News International employee working in his corner will not have helped, but fortunately his troops ensured that Cameron took a number of body blows particularly about those conversations hinged around the BSkyB takeover, he kept ducking and diving to evade the shots whether they were “inappropriate” or not! One wonders why his corner men did not give him a better briefing on Labour’s tactic for this manoeuvre,  surely it would have been far better for him to tell the ringside spectators that yes it was inevitable that people came to him and discussed the proposed deal, that’s just what we expect major companies to do with Prime Ministers, but actually I listened and fobbed them off, I told them I have no say in the matter, go and see Jeremy Hunt instead! Instead he stood there trying to parry the blows to the ribs round after round after round until with the final shot he just let out an anguished sigh! It was an unedifying end to a long fight.

Many will judge this fight as a draw and look forward to a rematch after the summer recess, Cameron’s judgement is still under question today and he needs to reveal the name of the company employed to vet Coulson on behalf of the Conservative Party when in Opposition, Miliband needs to get on with publishing the long list of contacts between himself and executives on News Corporation and News International, he also needs to consider if he should continue employing former Times man Tom Baldwin. Cameron scored his best shots by reminding the House that the priority now is to clean up the mess and revarnish the reputation of British journalism (for surely the phone hacking scandal can not be exclusive to News International), and to weed out those corrupt police officers who have been allegedly prepared to take bribes in return for information. He was adamant that the police investigation and the judicial enquiry must be allowed to go wherever the evidence leads them.

Miliband may think his summer holiday will be a cool breeze but he needs to ensure that Labour’s time in The Sun doesn’t leave him with nasty burn marks, whilst Prime Minister Cameron will head off to the coast still in a sweat, but with a dark cloud continuing to hang over him.

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

Balls up!

with 9 comments

Ed BallsJohnson resignation brings promotion for Ed “blinky” Balls.

The news of Alan Johnson’s resignation probably came as a shock for most of us, including the media and front line Labour politicians,  this morning both The Daily Telegraph and The Daily Mail, reveal that Johnson’s wife has had an alleged affair with the former Home Secretary’s close protection officer Paul Rice. Detective Constable Rice has currently been employed to protect the new Home Secretary Theresa May who was out of the country yesterday, and it is reported that he has been made the subject of enquiry by the Metropolitan Police Directorate of Professional Standards, which investigates complaints about conduct.

A Metropolitan Police statement said only that “certain matters regarding a constable were referred to the Directorate of Professional Standards”, adding “we are not in a position to discuss this matter any further”.

The messy outcome of the problems in Johnson’s personal life have been nothing short of a disaster for Labour’s new Leader Ed Miliband for a number of reasons, he has lost the “balance” in his Shadow Cabinet where Johnson was seen as the moderating communicator, even though his grasp of economic affairs appeared to be tenuous, the resulting promotion of Ed Balls to Shadow Chancellor brings back a man who was deliberately overlooked as Miliband tried to put some distance between himself and the outgoing Labour administration, the quick reshuffle of portfolios gave additional strength to the cohorts of Brown supporters, Miliband will also be seen as handing a communications “gift” to David Cameron and George Osborne who will gleefully spend months reiterating that Balls was one of the principle architects of Labour’s spend and burn economy.

All of a sudden the news agenda has shifted away from David Cameron and his difficulties with the NHS and the care of severely disabled children and on to the two “Edded”  hybrid which is charged with running the Opposition, Tories will make great play of the failed ambitions of Ed Balls to win the Labour Leadership election and of the weakness of Ed Miliband in having his hand forced in appointing a new Shadow Chancellor. With new appointments for “wee” Dougie Alexander, Ball’s wife Yvette Cooper, Tessa Jowell and Liam Byrne (the man who admitted they’d spent all of the money) his team becomes almost a replica of Labour’s last Cabinet, there appear to be only two missing, Gordon Brown and South Shields MP David Miliband.  This will not be lost on the coalition government who will point out the lack of new ideas and direction within the Labour Party, they are also likely to allude to the comparisons with Brown and Blair’s fractious relationship and try to develop the wedge that separates Ed Miliband and Ed Balls’ driving obsessions on economic policy.

Additionally this morning former Prime Minister Tony Blair is back in front of the Chilcot inquiry into the Iraq war where he will attempt to tell bits of the truth, the edited truth and nothing harmful to himself about the truth.

Oh yes the boys are definitely back in town today, spelling a total communications disaster for Miliband Minor as events and circumstance move totally outside of his control.

Of course they may be some truth in the old adage that it’s better to keep your friends close and your enemies even closer!

Guess who just got back today?
Them wild-eyed boys that had been away
Haven’t changed, haven’t much to say
But man, I still think them cats are crazy

ps – Did anyone else notice last night, just after the news of Ed Balls’ appointment that Sarah Brown sent a Tweet out from Gordon about economic policy? I guess he couldn’t manage to do it himself then and didn’t want to muddy the waters by making a press statement.

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

No sympathy for Moat

with one comment

PC David RathbandCase brought out best and worst in people

This is a picture of PC David Rathband, the policeman shot at almost point blank range by Raoul Moat as he sat in his police car in Newcastle, I make no apologies for including it here. PC Rathband was quite sure he was going to die and asked paramedics to tell his wife and small children that he loved them very much, let us remember now that he was a family man like many others of us in the north-east, he was only doing his job, a job which serves the public and carries, at times, enormous risks. Moat cared not a jot for PC Rathband or his family, just as he neglected any feelings at all for his former girlfriend Samantha Stobbart when he blasted her with a shotgun,  nor her new boyfriend Chris Brown who he shot dead with two cartridges in a callous deliberate act of murder.

Along with many others in South Shields I watched events play themselves out in Rothbury last Friday evening in a very public stand off covered by television news channels hoping that Moat might see the sense in giving up his weapon and delivering himself to the police, but alas events took a different turn, in a way that some had predicted when the felon discharged the weapon at his own head.

The whole episode since his release from prison saw variously the best and the worst in people from the north east and the sections of the media reporting the news, which amplified some of the tensions already existing between the public and the police. It was the actions of neighbourly well spirited people which gave the police the leads that they needed to track Moat down from Vigo to Rothbury, and it was the responsible journalists who responded correctly to Northumbria Police requests when they needed news blackouts and when they needed additional publicity to generate public cooperation. These actions undoubtedly resulted in fewer people being exposed to Moats fragile state of mind whilst in possession of a deadly firearm.

However, his boastful remarks of being in a war against the police have brought out the worst in others, allowing them to express themselves by leaving flowers at the scene of his death and at the scene of his other alleged crimes, the setting up of a Facebook “sympathy” page has also allowed these deluded people to gather together to create a rather silly looking image for people from the north east. It is no surprise that Prime Minister David Cameron has criticised these moves and proclaimed that there can be “no sympathy” for the callous murderer Moat.  Personally, although I find there is some merit in Simon Heffer’s arguments yesterday, I find the “sympathy for Moat movement” to be demeaning for the people of the north east, embarrassing to witness, and likely to provide the rest of the UK with the stereotypical imaging that they like to use to portray us as “thick northerners” – and nothing could be further from the truth!

Heffer’s somewhat misogynistic views don’t help his case, neither does his description of the folk of Rothbury as being “morally sub normal” (someone needs to educate him that Moat and his small band of followers are almost without exception resident many miles away from Rothbury, and the majority of folks interviewed in the town last Friday were clearly not originally from this region), however certain passages ring true and describe better the life of Moat the monster than the anti hero, especially when recalling the thoughts of another ex girlfriend:

Moat, according to her, engaged in acts that many men and women would not want to include in their domestic lives. He raped her. He would tie her up and flog her with a belt. He throttled her until she fainted. He hit her on her spine with a baseball bat. He kneed her in the face. She described him as “a living, breathing monster”. I for one would not seek to disagree with her.

Come on folks, do you really want to belittle this region by sympathising with someone who behaves like this?

Heffer touches on a note of dissatisfaction with our police forces and he may have a very salient point after the thirteen wasted years when greater and greater volumes of legislation have been dumped upon the heads of Chief Constables, who somehow have to manage their men and women in the prosecution of laws, many of which are more difficult to understand. The pressure built during the Blair and Brown years when public services became target driven led to a different type of police force than we were earlier used to, as they became more remote and too many beat officers were tied up behind desks completing mountains of forms and paperwork, by the end of the NuLabour regime Neighbourhood policing had become a “buzzword” in some forces, and in others this community aspect was carried out by volunteer uniformed “replacements”.

The police are good at mobilising themselves for murderers, rapists, abductors of children and possibly armed robbers. They are exceptionally good, too, at catching people who commit minor motoring offences. For the vast mass of crime in the middle – theft, burglary, mugging, flouting of the drugs laws and so on – they are utterly useless. Their role extends little beyond supplying a crime number to a victim so that a claim may be made on the victim’s insurance. That part of the operation might as well be privatised and sold to Lloyd’s. It is much easier to sit in a layby and catch someone driving over the speed limit than it is to retrieve the precious possessions of a family that has been burgled, so why try? That is how the public see the police, and it won’t do.

There is much to acknowledged there, and Heffer may well have caught the public mood, perceptions are often worth more than the realities, yet the reality is that our police forces have been driven off course by the battering of new legislation and target achieving, they no longer have the time or will to build rapport and community cohesion and have been weakened by top down pressures that have resulted in better figures but poorer reputations. Cameron and May have decided that there needs to be a bonfire of vanities in respect of some of the laws passed by NuLabour, something which is long overdue but will play but a small part in the rebuilding of trust between the police and the public, a trust that can only flourish with fewer simpler to understand laws which allow police men and women to get out of stations and into communities.

Perhaps then, all together, we can begin to relearn some common values of what is right and what is wrong and help each other to become “self policing” in a manner than does not require much more than common sense and common purpose. The Home Secretary and the Prime Minister along with Nick Clegg and his websites, face a huge challenge in finding those common moral values, as a quick read through the comments to Heffer’s article reaffirms that incidents such as this really have brought out the best and worst of people.

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

Tortures, inquiries, complicity, and Miliband

with 2 comments

South Shields MP David Miliband scrubbed down by “Brillo”

I still have huge misgivings and suspicions around British complicity in using intelligence gleaned during medieval torture sessions as part of the Blair/Bush T.W.A.T. (The War Against Terror). I’ve just watched some of Friday’s “This Week” where “Brillo” (Andrew Neill) gives David Milliband, the former Foreign Secretary and South Shields MP a good scrubbing over the allegations and the lack of a full and independent inquiry into the role of our intelligence services  and the Foreign Office’s attempts to suppress evidence due to be put before the courts whilst under Miliband’s leadership.

It was a reasonably good performance from our MP but three words that he uttered early in the encounter stick in my mind:

“It is conceivable”

He dealt with the questions as you would expect a veteran politician to deal with them, and as you would expect a contender for Labour’s leadership to handle them – admit to nothing, put it all off until the thirteen cases have been through the courts, wait until any further evidence presents itself in the courts, and have a new set of answers (if necessary) prepared by then for the eventuality. It is of course “conceivable” that Miliband’s position may be weakened further if fresh allegations and new evidence manages to see the light of day, but even now, after this competent political performance I was left feeling a bit like The Master of the Rolls, not fully trusting the statements of either Miliband or the Foreign Office regarding our role in these murky and muddied waters.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

David Miliband’s six lies : Peter Oborne

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

Written by curly

July 10, 2010 at 1:30 pm

28 day pre-charge detention is not necessary

leave a comment »

David Davis attacks coalition decision

Via Conservative Home

Former Shadow Home Secretary has attacked the new Home Secretary over her decision to renew the 28 day pre-charge detention period:

“Whilst it is welcome that she is having this review of Labour’s heavy-handed legislation, and whilst it is at least welcome that this is a six month rather than one year review, it is wholly unnecessary to extend further. There have been no cases in the last four years where it has been necessary to go beyond 21 days. Even the Heathrow plot, where innocent people were held for 28 days, it has now been proven that those that were charged after this lengthy period could have been charged in less than 14 days.

“This extension is therefore unnecessary and regrettable. It is to be hoped that after the 6 months review we will see an end not just to this unnecessarily authoritarian law, but also to control orders and their regime of house arrest, internal exile, and secret courts, all of which are an anathema of British standards of justice.”

Like Jonathan Isaby I’m a bit miffed that the coalition partners do not appear to be as libertarian as we first hoped, I’m also glad that (a) government backbenchers are not afraid to challenge the government on the issue and (b) that Conservative Home is proudly carrying it’s independent position during a period of government and not just behaving like the party puppy dog. Readers will appreciate that I have supported for a long time moves to remove some of the more draconian elements of legislation passed by the Blair/Brown governments in it’s so called “war against terror”.

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

Written by curly

June 24, 2010 at 5:33 pm

So, will you be voting?

leave a comment »

You bet!

Very amusing little advert.

add to del.icio.us :: Add to Blinkslist :: add to furl :: Digg it :: add to ma.gnolia :: Stumble It! :: add to simpy :: seed the vine :: :: :: TailRank :: post to facebook

Written by curly

April 20, 2010 at 9:05 am